Naples Zoo Conservation Projects You're Helping

Because Naples Zoo is not funded by taxes, it's your visits, membership, and donations that fund the care of the flora and fauna here in the gardens as well as around the world! The red icons on the map below to show Naples Zoo's recent conservation projects around the world. 

And What You Can Do

You have incredible power to change the world by what you buy, whom you support, and how you live. Find out what you can do today for conservation from your morning coffee to your favorite seafood dinner and even the snacks in between.

If you'd like to help support the nonprofit Naples Zoo in our conservation and education mission, please consider making a tax-deductible donation. (Learn more about supporting our award-winning organization.)

A History Rooted in Conservation

Today's nationally accredited Zoo and botanical garden has a rich history in conservation. The stewards of the Naples Zoo have long supported this ethic. In 1904, founder Dr. Henry Nehrling urged "It is high time to protect and preserve what is still left in Florida." In the 1950s, Julius Fleischmann rescued and expanded Nehrling's forgotten trees and planted new species to create a tropical garden attraction. In 1969, zoo founders Lawrence and Nancy Tetzlaff introduced wild animals into the garden. For decades, they taught programs on the need for conservation through film footage they'd taken on four continents. These programs included domestic concerns like the mid-1960s presentation "The Vanishing Everglades" and international issues in programs like "Brightest East Africa."

Inside the botanical garden, the natural atmosphere has promoted the reproduction of many rare and difficult to breed species. Today, a volunteer Board of Directors oversees the organization and works with a dedicated staff and senior management team to carry on the original vision.

Join with us in continuing this work by visiting, becoming a zoo member, or donating and helping to support at least one program for wild animals. We're in this together.